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Latest world protest headlines — Paris police fire tear gas at protest of racial injustice

Protesters react during a demonstration today in Paris. Paris riot officers fired tear gas as scattered protesters threw projectiles and set fires at an unauthorized demonstration against police violence and racial injustice. Several thousand people rallied peacefully for two hours around the main Paris courthouse in homage to George Floyd and to Adama Traore, a French black man who died in police custody. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

Here are summaries of the latest stories worldwise on the May 25 death in Minneapolis of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man who pleaded for air as a white police officer pressed a knee on his neck, including:

— Minnesota files civil rights complaint against Minneapolis police;

— President Trump ordered a show of force on Monday night;

— District of Columbia mayor’s office says Trump administration pondered taking over Metropolitan Police Department;

— Kennedy Center to dim lights for 9 nights to mark final minutes of George Floyd’s life;

— Virginia governor won’t send national guard to Washington;

— Minnesota prosecutors still working on Floyd case;

— Streets around White House sealed off and fence put up;

— Family members of George Floyd expected to attend memorial service;

— German minister backs peaceful protests in the US;

— EU envoy: George Floyd’s death an “appalling” abuse of power;

— Officer shot in Las Vegas, authorities respond to 2nd shooting;

— Hungary reprimands soccer player with Floyd slogan on shirt;

— Protesters march in Sydney in solidarity with US demonstrators.

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MINNEAPOLIS — The state of Minnesota has filed a civil rights charge against the Minneapolis Police Department in the wake of George Floyd’s death.

The state says it will investigate the department’s policies and practices over the last 10 years to determine whether it has engaged in “systemic” discrimination against people of color. The complaint comes from the state Department of Human Rights, which enforces the state’s human rights act. It targets a police department that has faced decades of allegations of brutality and other discrimination against African-Americans and other minorities including within the department itself.

Critics say the department has a culture that resists change and the department has come under fresh criticism after Floyd died after a white officer knelt on his neck and ignored his cries of “I can’t breathe” until Floyd eventually stopped moving.

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PARIS — Riot police fired tear gas today as scattered protesters in Paris pelted them with debris and set fires during an unauthorized demonstration against racial injustice and heavy-handed police tactics.

Several thousand people had previously rallied peacefully for two hours at the main Paris courthouse as global outrage over what happened to George Floyd in the United States kindled frustrations across borders and continents. The protesters also paid tribute to Adama Traore, a French black man who died in police custody.

Police had banned the protest because of coronavirus restrictions that had forbidden any gathering of more than 10 people.

As the demonstration wound down, police fired tear gas and protesters could be seen throwing debris. Two small fires broke out, and green and gray barriers surrounding a construction site were knocked over.

Tensions also erupted at a related protest in the southern city of Marseille. French protests sometimes degenerate into violence by a few rowdy demonstrators.

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WASHINGTON — Attorney General William Barr ordered law enforcement officials to clear Lafayette Park and push back the perimeter around the White House when he arrived there Monday evening, leading to police using tear gas to disperse protesters.

A person familiar with the matter tells The Associated Press that Barr expected the perimeter to have been extended much earlier Monday. The person could not discuss the matter publicly and spoke to AP on condition of anonymity.

The person said officials had met that morning and decided the perimeter had to be moved by at least one full block after multiple fires were set in the park the night before. They said that was expected to happen by Monday afternoon.

The person said Barr was surprised it hadn’t been done when he arrived in the early evening and directed action to be taken. They said he assumed police would use “typical crowd control measures” against protesters who resisted commands to clear the area.

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MINNEAPOLIS — Prosecutors are delaying the case against a man who drove his semitrailer into a crowd of protesters on a closed Minneapolis freeway.

The 35-year-old man drove his tanker truck into the midst of thousands of people who had gathered on Interstate 35W near downtown Minneapolis on Sunday. Authorities said it appeared no one was hurt and the man was arrested.

Gov. Tim Walz said the man became confused and somehow got on the freeway before traffic officials closed it.

Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman announced today that the case against the man has been deferred pending further investigation and he’ll be released from jail. Freeman said investigators are working to gather additional information to help in making a charging decision.

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WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump ordered military aircraft to fly above the nation’s capital on Monday night as a “show of force” against demonstrators protesting the death of George Floyd, according to two Defense Department officials.

Show-of-force missions are designed to intimidate and, in combat zones, warn opposing forces of potential military actions if provoked. The officials, who insisted on anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss ongoing operations publicly, did not say how many or what type of aircraft had been mobilized.

Videos and photographs posted on social media showed helicopters flying low over buildings and hovering just above groups of people on the street who were outside despite a district-wide curfew.

Today, roughly 700 members of the 82nd had arrived at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland and Fort Belvoir in Virginia. In addition, 1,400 more soldiers are ready to be mobilized within an hour, according to the two Defense Department officials. The soldiers are armed and have riot gear. They also have bayonets.

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RICHMOND, Va. — An angry crowd shouted down Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney today after police lobbed tear gas at a group of peaceful demonstrators during a protest over the death of George Floyd.

Several hundred people gathered outside City Hall chanted “Fire Them!” and repeatedly drowned out Stoney as he apologized and promised that the officers involved will face disciplinary action.

Video posted to social media of the Monday night incident shows a line of police launching tear gas toward a group of protesters who appeared to be yards away from the officers and peacefully gathered on the grass near a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Police Chief William Smith also apologized and took a knee briefly after being invited to do so by a woman in the crowd.

The tear gas was used on a group of protesters during a fourth night of protests over the killing of Floyd, a handcuffed black man who died after a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee on his neck for more than eight minutes as he pleaded for air.

The Richmond Police Department initially defended its use of tear gas but later retreated from that position after Smith reviewed video of the incident.

Stoney also apologized on Twitter and invited protesters to the meeting outside City Hall today.

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PHOENIX — The Arizona National Guard is assessing a request from President Donald Trump to provide troops to other states, Guard spokesman Maj. Aaron Thacker said today.

The Guard already has about 900 military police and other troops on duty after Gov. Doug Ducey ordered them to help back up state and local law enforcement dealing with weekend protests that at times turned violent.

Thacker said the Guard isn’t yet ready to send troops to other states.

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CLEVELAND — Cleveland Browns Pro Bowl guard Joel Bitonio hopes the NFL and its owners will use their platform to promote “love” and racial equality in the wake of protests following the death of George Floyd.

“People listen, kids listen,” Bitonio said today. “You start the younger generation and you teach them to love each other and to have that compassion and empathy for other people. That’s where it grows in this country, and so I hope players and ownership and the NFL as a whole uses the platform to really promote that love.”

Bitonio, who is white, said he has always appreciated the struggles some of his black teammates have endured in “really tough situations with law enforcement, or just in general.

A six-year veteran, Bitonio said it’s more vital than ever to show empathy because “people are hurting.” He said new Browns coach Kevin Stefanski spoke with his team on Monday about the situation.

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WASHINGTON — The Trump administration floated the idea of taking over the police force in the nation’s capital after days of violent demonstrations that led to fires and vandalism.

Officials with the District of Columbia mayor’s office said today that the White House raised the possibility of taking control of the Metropolitan Police Department. The officials said they told the White House they strongly objected and would challenge any attempt to do so in court.

The revelation comes a day after President Donald Trump and Attorney General William Barr told governors they needed to get tougher with violent protesters and to deploy the National Guard.

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PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo activated the National Guard today and is considering a curfew in response to a violent night in Providence that officials say was not a protest over the death of George Floyd but an organized effort to cause destruction.

Police received intelligence several hours prior to the violence late Monday and into today that people were coming from out of state armed with crowbars, flares and gasoline, State Police Col. James Manni said. A crowd of hundreds of people he described as a “mob” smashed storefront windows, stole merchandise, broke into a closed mall and torched a police cruiser.

More than 60 people were arrested and as many as 10 police officers were injured when they were hit by rocks or bricks, authorities said. organized attack on our community.”

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PARIS — Thousands of people defied a police ban today and converged on the main Paris courthouse for a demonstration to show solidarity with U.S. protesters and denounce the death of a black man in French police custody.

Police stood on nearby corners monitoring the largely young, multi-racial crowd, as hundreds of protesters streamed to the site on the northwest edge of Paris. The demonstration was organized to honor Frenchman Adama Traore, who died shortly after his arrest in 2016, and in solidarity with Americans demonstrating against George Floyd’s death.

Paris police banned the gathering a few hours before it was supposed to start, citing restrictions forbidding any gatherings of more than 10 people because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Traore case has become emblematic of the fight against police brutality in France. The circumstances of his death are still under investigation after four years of conflicting medical reports. Traore’s family says he died from asphyxiation because of police tactics and that his last words were, “I can’t breathe.”

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ST. LOUIS — A 77-year-old retired St. Louis police captain who served 38 years on the force was shot and killed by looters at a pawn shop early today, police said.

David Dorn was found dead on the sidewalk in front of the shop, which had been ransacked. Police have not released details of what led to the shooting and no one has been arrested.

The shooting and ransacking apparently was posted on Facebook Live before being taken down. It came on a violent night in the city, which saw four officers shot and businesses burned and ransacked, with people pelting officers with rocks hours after a peaceful protest over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis had ended.

Dorn was a friend of the pawn shop’s owner and frequently checked on the business when alarms went off, his wife told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Dorn retired in October 2007 from the St. Louis police force and became police chief in a small town north of the city.

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MINNEAPOLIS — A family attorney says a medical examiner’s findings that George Floyd had drugs in his system is a “red herring” meant to distract attention away from a Minneapolis police officer’s responsibility for his death.

During a news conference today, attorney Ben Crump also disputed the findings released by the Hennepin County Medical Examiner that the cause of death was cardiac arrest, which happened as police restrained Floyd and compressed his neck in a widely seen video that has sparked worldwide protests. The medical examiner also listed fentanyl intoxication and recent methamphetamine use, but not as the cause of death.

An autopsy commissioned by the family, which Crump released Monday, concluded that Floyd died of a lack of oxygen caused by the officers’ knees on his neck and back.

Crump called drug allegations “an attempt to assassinate his character” and said any drugs in his system were irrelevant to his cause of death.

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DALLAS — The family of George Floyd is expected to join a march in Houston today as protests continue nationwide in response to his death and other police killings of black people.

The march will begin shortly after Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is expected to lay out in Dallas how the state plans to curb unrest and destruction that has followed largely peaceful daytime demonstrations.

Dallas has imposed a curfew, and Monday night police conducted mass arrests on a downtown bridge where protesters marched.

Dallas Police Chief U. Renee Hall said most were released after being charged with obstructing a roadway, which came after demonstrators got down on one knee. She emphasized today that most protests were peaceful but warned “if you break the law, we will arrest you.”

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WASHINGTON — One of the nation’s premier performing arts centers says it will dim its lights starting today for nine nights to mark the final nine minutes of George Floyd’s life.

The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts says on Twitter that it will lower the lights to honor Floyd and others who lost their lives “as a result of racial violence and bigotry.” The center also says it’s working on “strategies” for greater collaboration with black artists, audiences and communities, and will share those initiatives in the weeks ahead.

Floyd died last week after Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin pressed his knee into Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes, continuing after Floyd had stopped moving and was pleading for air.

All four officers were fired and Chauvin has been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd’s death.

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WASHINGTON — The nearly 1,300 D.C. National Guard members who have been activated to deal with the civil unrest were joined Monday evening by Guardsmen from Utah and New Jersey, and almost 1,500 guardsmen are coming today from Indiana, South Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi, according to Gen. Joseph Lengyel, chief of the National Guard Bureau.

The general said more are due to arrive Wednesday.

A senior defense official said later that some states have turned down requests to send their Guard members to the District of Columbia, in some cases because governors are concerned about dealing with problems in their own state. The official spoke on condition of anonymity under ground rules set by the Pentagon. The official said New York and Delaware have declined to send Guard members to Washington, and Pennsylvania is considering the request but not yet given an answer.

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ATLANTA — Six Atlanta police officers have been charged after a dramatic video showed authorities pulling two young people from a car during protests over the death of George Floyd, a prosecutor said today.

Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard announced the charges during a news conference.

“I feel a little safer now that these monsters are off the street and no longer able to terrorize anyone else,” said Messiah Young, who was dragged from the vehicle along with his girlfriend, Taniyah Pilgrim, while they were caught in traffic.

The Saturday night incident first gained attention from video online and on local news. Throughout, the couple can be heard screaming and asking officers what is happening.

Two of the officers, Investigator Ivory Streeter and Investigator Mark Gardner, were fired Sunday.

Streeter and Gardner are both charged with aggravated assault. Two others are also charged with aggravated assault, while one is charged with aggravated battery. Some of the officers are also charged with criminal damage to property as well as pointing or aiming a gun.

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PORTLAND, Ore. — The mayor of Portland, Oregon said the city will not enact a curfew today night for the first time in four days after several thousand demonstrators remained largely peaceful during a march the night before.

Mayor Ted Wheeler thanked protesters and organizers who kept an hours-long march and gathering peaceful and said he saw “a community ready for healing and reconciliation.”

“I saw progress and I am 100 confident that Portland is primed to do the difficult and important work ahead,” Wheeler said.

The protest marked a turning point for Oregon’s largest city after demonstrations the previous three nights spun into violence, with protesters setting fires, breaking windows and breaking into a police headquarters and corrections center.

The evening was not without some violence, however. After the protest disbanded late Monday, about 100 people confronted police officers guarding the Justice Center in downtown Portland and threw projectiles at them, Police Chief Jami Resch said. Twelve people were arrested and two guns were seized from protesters, she said.

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TORONTO — Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canadians are watching what’s unfolding in the United States with “horror and consternation” and he paused for more than 20 seconds when asked about U.S. President Donald Trump and the use of tear gas against protesters for a photo opportunity.

Trudeau has long been careful not to poke Trump as Canada relies on the U.S. for 75 percent of exports. But Trudeau dramatically paused and struggled to come up with the right words when asked about the military action’s against protesters in the U.S. Police violently broke up a peaceful and legal protest by several thousand people in Lafayette Park across from the White House ahead of a speech in the Rose Garden by Trump on Monday evening. The protesters had gathered following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis a week earlier.

Afterward, Trump strolled off the White House grounds and walked to the cleared Lafayette Park to make a surprise visit to St. John’s Church. Standing alone in front of cameras, he raised a Bible but didn’t mention Floyd, the church or the peaceful protesters police had just cleared away.

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MINNEAPOLIS — More than $3 million has been raised to help rebuild south Minneapolis businesses damaged or destroyed in the sometimes violent protests that followed George Floyd’s death.

More than 38,000 donors have given to a fund set up by the Lake Street Council, a nonprofit that advocates for the area’s business community, at welovelakestreet.com.

Many protests since Floyd’s death have been peaceful. But dozens of businesses, many owned by immigrants and people of color, were hit by looting and arson. Floyd died May 25 after a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee into his neck for several minutes even after he stopped moving and pleading for air. The officer is charged with 3rd-degree murder.

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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Hundreds of people marched peacefully Monday night in downtown Albuquerque a day after a similar protest against the death of George Floyd preceded the setting of dozens of small fires and other damage in New Mexico’s most populous city.

There was a heavy police presence as the crowd that gathered Monday evening near the University of New Mexico marched in rain while chanting “I can’t breathe.”

The crowd began to disperse around 10 p.m. and most had left by midnight. Mayor Tim Keller said agitators for violence were to blame for damage that occurred hours after Sunday’ evening’s largely peaceful march.

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RICHMOND, Va. — Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam rejected a request from Secretary of Defense Mark Esper to send between 3,000 to 5,000 of the state’s national guard to Washington D.C. as part of a massive show of force organized by the Trump administration in response to violent protests, according to Northam’s chief of staff, Clark Mercer.

Mercer said Trump’s comments to governors in a phone call Monday, in which the president said most governors were “weak” and needed to “dominate” the streets, played a role in the decision.

“The president’s remarks to the governors heightened our concerns about how the guard would be used,” he said.

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MADISON, Wis. — Protesters spray painted graffiti on the Wisconsin state Capitol, dumped paint on the beloved “Forward” statue outside, broke into businesses downtown and defaced the Wisconsin Veterans Museum before police in riot gear used tear gas to disperse the crowd.

Police say that around 1 a.m. today someone fired a handgun in the air, two men were beaten with a crowbar and others attempted to light Molotov cocktails. Madison Police Chief Vic Wahl says in his blog that multiple police officers were struck with rocks and projectiles.

It was the third night of violence in Madison, the liberal state capital with one of the deepest racial divides in the nation. There was also a peaceful protest Monday night in Milwaukee in reaction to the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

The unrest late Monday in Madison came after an hours-long peaceful protest during which the mayor spoke with marchers who stopped traffic on a busy six-lane street downtown. Although the demonstration was tense at times it had moments of levity, with participants line dancing in the street.

Madison police said 15 people were arrested Monday night, bringing the number of arrests since Saturday to at least 32.

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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Arkansas authorities used tear gas for the third night in a row Monday to disperse protests outside the state Capitol over the death of George Floyd.

Arkansas State Police fired tear gas to break up the protest, which had grown to several hundred people in downtown Little Rock and went beyond a 10 p.m. curfew the city’s mayor implemented because of the demonstrations and the coronavirus outbreak..

Mayor Frank Scott marched with demonstrators and pleaded for calm. But the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported some protesters became unruly. Buildings along Capitol Avenue, including a bank, were damaged and crews put out a fire at the Arkansas Pharmacists Association building.

The Democrat-Gazette reported one of its reporters was assaulted and taken to the hospital late Monday night.

The damage followed mostly peaceful demonstrations throughout the day that included Little Rock’s police chief meeting with protesters outside City Hall.

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NEW YORK — New York’s mayor extended an 8 p.m. curfew all week in hopes of stopping destruction that continued overnight despite the city’s efforts to stop protests over George Floyd’s death from devolving into lawless mayhem.

“We’re going to have a tough few days. We’re going to beat it back,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a news conference today as he announced that an 8 p.m.-to-5 a.m. curfew would hold through Sunday.

The plan came after a night when chaos broke out in midtown Manhattan and the Bronx.

On Monday, an 11 p.m. curfew — the city’s first in decades — failed to prevent destruction as groups of people smashed their way into shops, including Macy’s flagship Manhattan store.

Police said nearly 700 people were arrested and several officers were injured during the chaos Monday night and early today.

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LAS VEGAS — Separate shootings in Las Vegas during continuing protests over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis have left one man dead and a police officer gravely wounded.

Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo said today that the officer was on life support after being shot as police tried to disperse a crowd of protesters outside a Las Vegas strip hotel and casino.

Lombardo says the other shooting happened outside a federal building. He says a man was shot by officers several times after he reached for a weapon. The identities of the wounded officer and the fatally shot man have not been made public.

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STOCKHOLM — More than six thousand people have attended a Sweden-organised online protest to express support with the Black Lives Matter movement.

The digital “Sweden in solidarity with Black Lives Matter” rally today urged participants to “check in” at the Facebook accounts of the U.S. Embassy in Sweden and Nordic neighbors Denmark, Finland and Norway and post photos inspired by the ongoing U.S. events with George Floyd’s death.

The one hour-long online event with several speakers including poets, activists and politicians was organised by Swedish non-governmental organisations and Aysha Jones, a Gambia-born and Sweden-based activist and fashion blogger.

Jones said the protest was important to show support to people in America, but also to remind Swedes that racism “does exist here, it’s very real and people are being harmed from it.”

In his speech, Rashid Musa, head of the Young Muslims of Sweden, called the current situation with African Americans in the United States as “colonialism 2.0.”

“Malcom X said it best: ‘Racism is like a Cadillac, they bring out a new model every year,'” Musa said.

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MINNEAPOLIS — Minnesota’s attorney general says prosecutors are working as fast as they can to determine whether more charges will be filed against officers involved in the death of George Floyd, but they also have to work carefully and methodically.

Attorney General Keith Ellison was appointed lead prosecutor in the case Sunday. He told “Good Morning America” today that those who have culpability will be held accountable.

Floyd, who was black, died May 25 after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee against Floyd’s neck as Floyd said he couldn’t breathe and became motionless. Derek Chauvin has been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. But members of Floyd’s family and many others are calling for more serious charges, as well as charges against the three other officers who were there.

Ellison says despite the widely viewed bystander video of Floyd’s final moments, cases against police are hard. He pointed to the deaths of Freddie Gray and Philando Castile, and the beating of Rodney King, as examples of cases where striking video of an incident did not lead to convictions of officers.

Ellison did not give a timeline for any new charges. All four officers have been fired.

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ORLANDO, Fla. — The U.S. Census Bureau says it has temporarily closed offices in several cities as a precaution as cities grapple with unrest following the death of George Floyd.

The Bureau would not say Monday which offices have been closed. A spokeswoman says in an email that the closures were done out of an abundance of caution.

The Census Bureau is in the middle of the 2020 census, which is attempting to count every resident in the U.S.

Census Bureau offices around the country were closed for a month and a half as field operations were suspended in March to stop the spread of the coronavirus. The offices only began reopening on a rolling basis in the past several weeks.

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TOPEKA, Kan. — Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly says that bringing the military “into this contentious moment” would do more harm than good.

Kelly on Monday expressed sympathy for George Floyd’s family, families of other people killed by police and people outraged by Floyd’s “tragic murder.” She promised to work to address systemic racism.

“We need our leaders — myself included — to listen to those who felt their only means of being heard was to take to the street in protest,” Kelly said after President Donald Trump threatened to deploy the military to states if they did not stamp out violent protests.

“We need action to change the systemic inequalities we have ignored for far too long. We need to stop with the divisive language and instead, come together and do what’s right for our state,” Kelly added.

She noted that Kansas protests have been peaceful and promised to work closely with local officials to ensure public safety.

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WASHINGTON — The streets around the White House complex were shut this morning, guarded by a mix of Secret Service officers and FBI agents.

Overnight, a fence was constructed around Lafayette Park and along 17th St at Pennsylvania Ave, two areas that have been focal points for protests.

Work crews were still at work boarding up businesses in the area and attempting to remove graffiti from federal buildings.

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BUFFALO, N.Y. — A state trooper who was run over by an SUV that barreled through a group of officers at a George Floyd demonstration in Buffalo broke his leg and shattered his pelvis, police said.

Another trooper and a Buffalo police officer were treated for minor injuries after being struck by the Ford Explorer when it broke through a blockade at about 10 p.m. Monday.

Troopers were deployed to Buffalo after violence flared downtown this weekend.

Officers fired shots at the vehicle before it was apprehended. The driver and a passenger had been shot and were hospitalized with injuries not considered life threatening. A second passenger was uninjured and taken into custody, police said.

It was not immediately clear whether the pair in the SUV were wounded by police. Officials in Buffalo initially said they may have been shot at a nearby intersection shortly before the officers were struck. State police say the investigation continues.

The unidentified trooper who was run over was treated at a hospital. The other trooper was treated and released for a hand-and-wrist injury.

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WASHINGTON — A man in the nation’s capital said he sheltered about 70 protesters in his home all night after they got caught between police lines after curfew.

Rahul Dubey told WJLA-TV he was sitting on his porch around 8:30 p.m. last night when law enforcement officers began corralling protesters on his street. He let some sit with him, and helped others out through his back alley, but the situation then escalated when officers started pushing protesters to the ground and releasing pepper spray, creating a “human tsunami” into his home.

“I was hanging on my railing yelling, ‘Get in the house! Get in the house!'” he told The Washington Post.

Officers also released pepper-spray through the window after he closed the door, Dubey told WJLA-TV. The protesters inside the home screamed, and started pouring water and milk into their eyes in a scene he described as “pure mayhem.”

One officer came to the door to ask for a piece of the pizza that was delivered to the house overnight as Dubey was on the phone with the TV station, WJLA reported. The protesters left the home after 6 a.m. today when the district’s curfew ended.

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ST. LOUIS — Police in St. Louis say officers in a marked police car were fired on early today from a car occupied by suspected looters.

The incident led to a chase that ended in the suburb of Jennings, where one of the suspects was shot. Police said the incident was separate from a shooting around midnight Monday in which four St. Louis officers were shot and injured.

The Jennings shooting began when officers in a marked police car on the north side of St. Louis who were searching for looting suspects were fired on from men inside a car, police said. That led to a chase that ended in Jennings, just north of St. Louis, when the three suspects bailed out of the car, and one was shot by a St. Louis County officer, police said.

One man, identified only as 21 years old, was taken to a hospital with life-threatening injuries. Police said another man who had been in the car was arrested, and a third escaped.

No officers were injured in the Jennings shooting.

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MINNEAPOLIS — Family members of George Floyd are expected to attend a memorial service in his honor Thursday in Minneapolis.

The Rev. Al Sharpton is to deliver the eulogy at the service on the campus of North Central University.

The civil rights organization Sharpton founded, National Action Network, organized the memorial. The family’s attorney, Ben Crump, is also expected to make remarks at the service from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

A Minneapolis police officer was charged last week with third-degree murder in Floyd’s death May 25, and three other officers were fired. Bystander video showed the white officer, Derek Chauvin, holding his knee on the neck of the black man while he pleaded for air with his hands handcuffed behind him.

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WASHINGTON — Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser said on CNN today it’s inappropriate for the military to be used for police work on U.S. streets.

“We don’t think that the active duty military should be used on American streets against Americans,” he said.

“It’s an inappropriate use of our military. And we have police in Washington, D.C. We have federal police in Washington, D.C., to focus on the federal properties, and that is an appropriate use. Police have policing power, and bringing in the military to do police work is inappropriate in any state in the United States of America without the consent of the governor, and it would be inappropriate in Washington, D.C.”

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NEW YORK — An unprecedented curfew in New York City did little to prevent destruction as groups of people smashed their way into shops including Macy’s flagship Manhattan store, grabbed merchandise and fled.

Police said more than 200 people were arrested and several officers were injured during the chaos Monday night and early today that followed another day of peaceful protests throughout the city over the death of George Floyd. One officer was struck by a hit-and-run driver in the Bronx and was taken to a hospital in critical condition, police said.

Monday was the fourth night in a row of mainly peaceful daytime demonstrations followed by violence and arrests after nightfall.

Mayor Bill de Blasio and Gov. Andrew Cuomo, both Democrats, announced an 11 p.m. curfew late Monday afternoon. De Blasio said today’s curfew would start earlier — beginning at 8 p.m. and ending at 5 a.m — in an effort to quell late-night violence and destruction.

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ST. PAUL, Minn. — At least 65 people were arrested at Minnesota’s Capitol in St. Paul Monday night for violating a curfew, police said. They gathered peacefully on the Capitol grounds following a march down a St. Paul street.

Thousands had gathered earlier in the day at the governor’s mansion to demand the arrest and prosecution of all four former police officers involved in the death of George Floyd.

In Minneapolis, at the site of Floyd’s fatal encounter with police that has become a memorial, the crowd grew slightly agitated awaiting the arrival of police, but there was no widespread property damage.

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BERLIN — Germany’s foreign minister says the peaceful protests in the United States following the death of George Floyd are “understandable and more than legitimate.”

Heiko Maas said in Berlin today that his thoughts are with the friends and family of Floyd, who “lost his life in a truly terrible and shocking way, or one should say it was taken from him.”

Maas said that peaceful protests must always be allowed. He added that “the peaceful protest we are seeing in the United States — with many very moving gestures including by American police officers — this protest is understandable and more than legitimate.”

He added: “I can only express my hope that the peaceful protests do not continue to lead to violence, but even more express the hope that these protests have an effect in the United States.”

Maas also stressed that journalists must be able to do their jobs without risking their safety and criticized violence against them.

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BRUSSELS — The European Union’s top diplomat said today the death of George Floyd was the result of an abuse of power and that the 27-nation bloc is “shocked and appalled” by it.

EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell told reporters that “like the people of the United States, we are shocked and appalled by the death of George Floyd.”

Floyd died last week after he was pinned to the pavement by a white police officer in Minneapolis who put his knee on the handcuffed black man’s neck until he stopped breathing. His death set off protests that spread across America.

Borrell says law enforcement officials must not be “using their capacities in the way that has been used in this very, very unhappy death of George Floyd. This is an abuse of power and this has to be denounced.”

He underlined that Europeans “support the right to peaceful protest, and also we condemn violence and racism of any kind, and for sure, we call for a de-escalation of tensions.”

Borrell says “we trust in the ability of the Americans to come together, to heal as a nation and to address these important issues during these difficult times.”

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BUDAPEST, Hungary — The Hungarian soccer federation has issued a written reprimand to a player of African origin who showed his undershirt with the words “Justice for George Floyd” after scoring for Ferencvaros in its 1-1 draw with Puskas Akademia on Sunday.

Tokmac Nguen was born in a refugee camp in Kenya to parents from South Sudan and grew up in Norway.

The federation’s disciplinary committee said in its ruling issued Monday that any similar actions by Nguen in the future would result in “actual penalties” on each occasion.

Just hours after Nguen’s reprimand, FIFA, the world soccer’s governing body urged soccer competition organizers to apply “common sense” and consider not sanctioning players demanding justice for Floyd during matches.

The German soccer federation is investigating similar actions by four players in the Bundesliga, including American midfielder Weston McKennie, who wore an armband over his Schalke jersey with the handwritten message “Justice for George.”

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LAS VEGAS — An officer has been shot in Las Vegas and authorities are responding to another shooting as people protest the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, authorities said.

The officer was shot in the area of the Las Vegas Strip and an officer was involved in a shooting in the downtown area, according to Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department

Protesters have been rallying for days across the country over the death of George Floyd, a black man seen on video pleading that he couldn’t breathe while a white police officer pressing his knee into his neck for several minutes before he stopped moving.

Police in Las Vegas said Monday that 338 people were arrested during three nights of protests. Police said suspects were jailed despite a local court policy calling for most people accused of misdemeanors to receive court summons to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

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SEOUL — South Korea’s Foreign Ministry says it has far confirmed 79 cases of property damage at stores run by Korean Americans amid U.S. protests over the death of George Floyd.

The ministry, which held a teleconferencing meeting with diplomats based in the United States to review the demonstrations’ impact on Korean Americans and South Korean citizens, said today it has yet to confirm any injuries or deaths.

The ministry says 50 cases of property damage were reported from Philadelphia, 10 from Minneapolis, five form Raleigh and four from Atlanta.

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SYDNEY — More than 1,000 protesters marched through downtown Sydney today in solidarity with Americans demonstrating against the death of George Floyd half a world away.

Police escorted a crowd carrying banners that said: “Black Lives Matter,” “Aboriginal Lives Matter,” “White Silence is Violence” and “We See You, We Hear You, We Stand With You.”

The group marched from Hyde Park to New South Wales state Parliament with plans to continue to the U.S. Consulate.

The protest proceeded despite some organizers canceling it Monday for fear of conflict with counter protesters. But no counter protest emerged.

Around 2,000 demonstrators gathered in Australia’s west coast city of Perth on Monday night to peacefully protest Floyd’s death, and rallies are planned for other Australian cities this week.

Referring to the violence in U.S. streets, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said “there’s no need to import things … happening in other countries here to Australia.”

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ST. LOUIS — Police say four officers were hit by gunfire after protests in St. Louis that started peacefully Monday became violent overnight, with demonstrators smashing windows and stealing items from businesses and fires burning in the downtown area.

The police department tweeted early today that the officers were taken to a hospital with injuries that were not believed to be life-threatening. It was unclear who had fired the shots.

The chaos in St. Louis followed continued protests Monday in Missouri over the death of George Floyd and police treatment of African Americans, with gatherings also held in Kansas City and Jefferson City.

On Monday afternoon, several hundred people rallied peacefully outside the justice center in downtown St. Louis, including Mayor Lyda Krewson and St. Louis Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards. Protestors later walked to the Gateway Arch National Park and then onto nearby Interstate 64.

But later Monday, protesters gathered in front of police headquarters, where officers fired tear gas. Some protesters smashed windows at a downtown 7-11 store and stole items from inside before the building was set on fire.

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NEW YORK — New York City imposed a late-night curfew Monday that failed to prevent another night of destruction, including arrests after a break-in at the iconic Macy’s store on 34th Street, following protests over George Floyd’s death.

As the 11 p.m. deadline to get off the streets approached, bands of protesters marched peacefully through Manhattan and Brooklyn, but police simultaneously responded to numerous reports of roving groups of people smashing their way into shops and emptying them of merchandise.

The doors of Macy’s flagship Manhattan store were breached. Police pulled two handcuffed men out and put them in a van.

People rushed into a Nike store and carried out armloads of clothing. Near Rockefeller Center, storefront windows were smashed and multiple people arrested. Bank windows were smashed. Wreckage littered the inside of an AT&T store.

Video posted on social media showed some protesters arguing with people breaking windows, urging them to stop, but instances of vandalism and smash-and-grab thefts mounted as the night deepened.

New York joined other cities around the country in imposing a curfew after days of unrest. It comes on top of months of restrictions on public gatherings already imposed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Enough mayhem happened before the curfew took effect that Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted that it would move up to 8 p.m. today. The curfew lifts at 5 a.m.

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BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Workers in Alabama’s largest city began removing a Confederate monument Monday night after demonstrators failed to knock down the obelisk the night before.

Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin sent workers with heavy equipment to take down the more than 50-foot-tall Confederate monument made of stone. Late on Monday, after a 7 p.m. curfew took effect and streets were mostly clear, crews began their work.

Live video showed workers attaching straps to the peak of the obelisk so it could be lifted away with a crane. Within a few hours they had removed the top of the monument.

Woodfin said the city would see if the memorial could be given to a museum or another group.

Woodfin said the fine the city may face for violating a state law banning the removal of Confederate and other long-standing monuments is more affordable than the cost of continued unrest in the city.

Attorney General Steve Marshall, in a statement, said the city would face an assessment of $25,000 if it removed the monument, which has been the subject of a court fight between the mostly black city and Republican-controlled state.

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CICERO, Ill. — Two people have been killed during unrest in the Chicago suburb of Cicero as protests continued over the death of George Floyd, according to a town official.

Spokesman Ray Hanania says 60 people were arrested in the town of about 84,000 located west of Chicago. Hanania didn’t provide additional information about those killed or the circumstances of their deaths.

The Illinois State Police and Cook County Sheriff’s Office were called in to help local police Monday as people broke into a liquor store and other businesses and stole items.

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BUFFALO, N.Y. — A vehicle plowed through a group of law enforcement officers at a George Floyd demonstration Monday night in Buffalo, injuring at least two.

Video from the scene shows the vehicle accelerating through an intersection shortly after officers apparently tackle a protester on the street and handcuff him. Officers are seen scattering to avoid the SUV as it drives off on Buffalo’s east side. Apparent gunshots are heard.

The officers were taken to Erie County Medical Center. Authorities said they were in stable condition.

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