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Freedom is hard to accept by many people in America

DEAR EDITOR:

I’ve spent 40-plus years explaining, providing guidance to clients many rules and regulations applicable to running a business, specifically applicable to “employer-employee relationship.”

Often mandates are confusing, difficult to adhere to, centered on the fact they are not pursuant with one’s belief or understanding.

The same lies with understanding, accepting the “freedom” we enjoy and expect in the USA, supported by our Constitution. When such freedom butts up against one’s beliefs, feelings and positions on a subject, it doesn’t seem right, doesn’t appear what Americans should do or feel. Those taking a different position often are labeled “unpatriotic.” I believe it’s the opposite.

“Patriot” by definition is someone “who vigorously supports his / her country and is prepared to defend it against enemies or detractors.” It is the “detractors,” those who see things differently — whether it is applying a law or action being taken by our government — that being a “patriot” allows them to take a stand.

We may not like the position they may take — kneeling during national anthem, marching against racial injustice or boycotting a company or state for action taken by such. But if you subscribe to, if you understand the power, the appreciation of living in a nation that provides, ensures such freedom, you accept those positions taken. You may not agree, but you need to accept those actions, with some caveats.

Such positions, such protests must not, cannot place anyone or our nation in harm’s way, such as what was done Jan. 6 at our nation’s Capitol. Those who were involved in the insurrection were not “patriots.” Doesn’t matter if they were carrying and waving the American flag or not. They had the right to gather right to protest, the right to voice their opinion, but not the right to violate set perimeters, to destroy property or to cause the death of our police.

Yes, freedom to praise who you choose, to love who you choose, to protest peacefully who / what you wish is what I see is the strength, backbone of our nation.

Let me close by saying that as a child, young adult of the ’60s, one slogan that bothered me most was “America, love it or leave it.” That isn’t what America is all about. That isn’t how we became and continue to grow stronger as a “free nation.” We have seen wrongdoings, and we have changed them so as to better our citizenship and to continue to be the “Land of the Free,” the greatest nation in the world. God bless America.

JOHN P. LESEGANICH

Canfield

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