Wed. 9:12 a.m.: Justice agrees to turn over docs; impeachment cry grows

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., speaks during a hearing without former White House Counsel Don McGahn, who was a key figure in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chairman of the House intelligence committee has postponed a meeting to enforce a subpoena against the Justice Department after the department agreed to hand over a cache of documents related to special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

California Rep. Adam Schiff said the committee “will begin turning over to the committee 12 categories of counterintelligence and foreign intelligence materials as part of an initial rolling production.”

On Tuesday, the department offered to provide documents if the committee agreed not to enforce the subpoena. Schiff had said the panel would take “enforcement action” but had not specified if that would be contempt of Congress or some other sort of action.

The agreement is a rare detente in escalating tensions between Congress and President Donald Trump’s administration over oversight matters.

Meanwhile, more Democrats are calling — and more loudly — for impeachment proceedings against Trump after his latest defiance of Congress by blocking his former White House lawyer from testifying.

A growing number of rank-and-file House Democrats, incensed by former counsel Don McGahn’s empty chair in the Judiciary Committee hearing room on Tuesday, are confronting House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and pushing her and other leaders to act. Their impatience is running up against the speaker’s preference for a more methodical approach, including already unfolding court battles.

Pelosi summoned some of them — still a small fraction of the House Democratic caucus — to a meeting of investigators today to assess strategy.

Trump this morning repeated his mantra about Democrats contributing to a “Witch Hunt” against him.

“The Democrats are getting ZERO work done in Congress,” he tweeted.

Some Democratic leaders, while backing Pelosi, signaled that a march to impeachment may become inevitable.

“We are confronting what might be the largest, broadest cover-up in American history,” Majority Leader Steny Hoyer told reporters. If a House inquiry “leads to other avenues including impeachment,” the Maryland Democrat said, “so be it.”

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