Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Place An Ad | All Access E-Edition | Home RSS
 
 
 

Sun., 8:37 pm: Spring snowstorm hits Rockies, threatens Plains

May 11, 2014
The Associated Press , Tribune Chronicle

DENVER - A powerful spring storm dropped more than a foot of sloppy, wet snow in parts of Colorado and Wyoming on Mother's Day, and forecasters warned that instability ahead of the cold front created conditions ripe for tornadoes and severe thunderstorms in the Plains states.

The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for most of northern Colorado and parts of southern Wyoming for all of today and for Monday morning. Strong thunderstorms and tornadoes developed in Nebraska and were threatening to push south today. The storm also created high winds across the West.

Kyle Fredin, a meteorologist for the weather service in Boulder, said the weather pattern is typical for this time of year, and "it's going to be kind of the same thing pretty much through the end of June."

Several tornadoes were reported in southeastern Nebraska, the weather service said, blowing down outbuildings and damaging power poles and irrigation systems. Large hail and strong winds seen in the state were expected to head south into Kansas, and a tornado watch was issued for parts of Oklahoma.

In Colorado, Department of Transportation officials said plunging temperatures and heavy, wet snow have created icy conditions and forced several closures along Interstate 70 west of Denver this afternoon. Multiple accidents were reported on the mountain corridor, frustrating skiers and snowboarders eager to get a few more runs in before the season ends. Authorities also closed parts of Interstate 25 because of several accidents this afternoon.

Snow amounts could vary greatly, but up to 15 inches could fall at higher elevations and 4 to 9 inches could fall at lower elevations, including Denver and other cities along Colorado's Front Range.

 
 

 

I am looking for: