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Deaths, divorces and catching up from vacation

September 30, 2010 - Andy Gray
I’m back in the office for the first time in a week after a long weekend in Orlando, Fla. And it seems the “Rule of Threes” when it comes to celebrity deaths must have multiplied while I was gone.

Among the dead are singer Eddie Fisher, who performed at Packard Music Hall with Kenley Players; Arthur Penn, who directed the influential ‘60s film “Bonnie & Clyde”; and Greg Giraldo, a smart, funny and talented standup comedian who regularly was seen on Comedy Central and played the Funny Farm Comedy Club in Liberty in 2004.

The latest name on the list is actor Tony Curtis, who died late Wednesday at age 85. Curtis starred in one of my all-time favorite movies, “Some Like It Hot” with Jack Lemmon and Marilyn Monroe, and I got a chance to interview him back in 1992 when the Butler Institute of American Art featured an exhibition of his paintings.

Curtis was as charming as you would expect and still was maintaining his reputation as a ladies man, when he was in his late 60s. I’ll always remember the quote I used to close that story.

In addition to acting and painting, Curtis said, “I am writing my autobiography. I am writing a screenplay, and I take beautiful women to dinner. I lead a full life.”

* I wasn’t shocked when I read that writer-director Cameron Crowe and Nancy Wilson of Heart were getting a divorce after more than 20 years of marriage and that they had been separated since 2008.

I interviewed Wilson last year to preview Heart’s appearance at the Covelli Centre. The interview took place about a week after it was announced that Crowe would be creating the mini-movies that would introduce each genre of music at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame anniversary concerts in New York City. When I made a passing mention of that during the conversation, it seemed as if she didn’t know anything about it. There was no overt “no comment” response, but her tone gave me the impression she didn’t want to talk about her husband.

 
 

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