We the people still hold majority

DEAR EDITOR:

This is in response to Tribune Chronicle Editor Brenda J. Linert’s July 29 column regarding saving us Ohioans from ballot initiatives.

Her comments truly reflect the Tribune’s conservative bias that we need to save us from ourselves. She quotes Dale Butland, a Democratic strategist and opponent of issue 2 to help make her case sound plausible that “voters oftentimes don’t have the time to research these issues.” That is pure bunk.

She claims, “It’s time to make it more difficult to get issues on Ohio ballots,” as those we elect can do research and debate issues for the voters.

But what about legislation that never makes it the ballot because the majority in government don’t happen to agree with it?

Her theory is that getting enough signatures from the electorate to place an initiative on the ballot can sometimes create bad law. In keeping with her theory, if the initiatives are so bad, then the voters will reject them right?

Her theory that only elected representatives know what is a good or bad law to be brought before the people certainly supports the current Ohio GOP’s unwillingness, after two years of stalling and now admitting that they will miss the implementation deadline for Issue 2, is justified because conservative lawmakers don’t like it. They are obstructing implementation because they hold the majority and they can.

We the people hold the majority, the legislature works for us. Apparently we’re too stupid to bring legislation to the ballot that Ohioans want, and if we do and it passes, it’s okay to obstruct its implementation. Her claim that ballot initiatives “can create problems” can apply to civil rights, a women’s right to vote and other landmark legislation that became ballot initiatives because those in power didn’t think they were worthy causes. Power is granted by the people.

We’ll continue to decide what goes on the ballot if they won’t. Now if we could just get them to implement the will of the people.

MARY ANNE KALE

Warren

COMMENTS