Serve constituents, not donors

DEAR EDITOR:

Tax reform needs to occur and not in a watered-down version. It should be simple, straightforward and without loophole deductions. And it should be embraced by both parties.

The big question is can anything get done that will help the average citizen? The Democrats are the party of bad ideas hindering productivity and limits our freedoms and abilities to make a living, which shrinks our middle class. On the other hand, the Republicans are the party of opposition to each other. Republicans failed even to repeal the ACA, despite controlling both the legislative and executive branches of government. How is that possible? The question most of us are asking is, why are politicians failing to do what is good for the average citizen?

The answer may lie in John Nash’s Equilibrium Theory. To sustain their seats of power for their party, they are doing what’s best for themselves and their party — not what’s in the greatest good for the American people. If Congress acted as one group instead of two parties fighting for power, they would be working for all Americans, not just special interest groups on each side of the aisle. This is the game theory being played out in our political system.

If they were truly serious about tax reform and simplification, they would phase out the current tax code altogether and replace it with the Fair Tax bill S.18 — 115th Congress (2017-2018). More than likely, their self interest will take first place with the Democrats claiming it’s only for the rich and the Republicans still trying to keep many of the same deductions in the bill for the lobbyists who support both sides of this equation. The Fair Tax would remove power and money-making ability from both parties and obstruct their major fundraising efforts which is writing loopholes in the tax code for corporations, billionaires and special interest groups, in exchange for large campaign contributions and favors.

If they did implement the Fair Tax Act, it would eliminate a large amount of corruption in D.C. Most of our current politicians feed on legal corruption (pay to play) like carps snacking on bread at the Linesville, Pa., spillway. Neither party is exempt from this. Nor can either party claim the moral high road. To put it simply, legal corruption is campaign contributions given for favors granted. Just remember, it’s always about the money, power and how their party can maintain power and not about the people they serve. If the GOP doesn’t wake up soon and produce, they will be the party receiving the shellacking in 2018. Leadership is the ability to influence others. Is either side actually demonstrating leadership?

TIM SANTELL

Kinsman

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