Fri. 8:43 a.m.: Sanders says no culture of lying at White House

Attorney General William Barr speaks alongside Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, right, and acting Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General Edward O'Callaghan, left, about the release of a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report during a news conference, Thursday at the Department of Justice in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s spokeswoman Sarah Sanders is pushing back today on allegations that special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia report exposed a culture of lying at the White House.

Sanders also disputed allegations that she misled the media when she said that “countless” members of the FBI had lost confidence in FBI Director James Comey, which led to his firing.

Sanders had told reporters after Comey’s 2017 dismissal that she had heard from “countless” members of the FBI who welcomed the president’s decision.

She told ABC’s “Good Morning America” this morning that her word “countless” was a “slip of the tongue” made in the “heat of the moment.”

Democratic House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, also speaking on ABC, said the Mueller report clearly outlines “a culture of lying” inside the White House.

Meanwhile, House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler says he expects to issue a subpoena within a few hours for special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

The New York Democrat told ABC’s “Good Morning America” this morning that he is preparing a subpoena not only for Mueller’s complete report, but also for the underlying documents, including grand jury evidence.

He said, “We need the entire report, unredacted, and the underlying documents in order to make informed decisions.”

Attorney General William Barr sent the Mueller report to Congress, with some material redacted, including grand jury information. Grand jury evidence, including witness interviews, is normally off limits but can be obtained in court.

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