Mon. 3:55 p.m.: Gunman’s brother in Vegas as police seek to find motive

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, file photo, personal belongings and debris litters the Route 91 Harvest festival grounds across the street from the Mandalay Bay resort and casino in Las Vegas. On Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, gunman Stephen Paddock carried out the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, leaving Americans try to come to terms with yet another mass murder. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, file photo, personal belongings and debris litters the Route 91 Harvest festival grounds across the street from the Mandalay Bay resort and casino in Las Vegas. On Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, gunman Stephen Paddock carried out the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, leaving Americans try to come to terms with yet another mass murder. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Investigators met with the brother of the Las Vegas gunman while friends and relatives of the 58 killed and other concert-goers who survived the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history returned today to reclaim baby strollers, shoes, phones, backpacks and purses left behind in the panic as they fled.

The interviews with Stephen Paddock’s brother Saturday and Sunday were part of an exhaustive search through the 64-year-old’s life in search of clues about why he unleashed gunfire from broken windows in the 32rd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel casino.

Eric Paddock declined to say what he was asked, but he said he’s cooperating with investigators, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal. He declined interview requests from The Associated Press.

“I’m trying to get them to understand Steve’s mindset,” Eric Paddock told the newspaper. “I don’t want them to chase bad leads.”

In a newly revealed court document obtained by CNN, Stephen Paddock described himself as a nocturnal creature who bet up to $1 million each night while gambling at Las Vegas casinos in flip-flops and sweat pants, catching sleep in the day. The description of his lifestyle comes from a deposition filed as part of a civil lawsuit he filed against Cosmopolitan Hotel, where he slipped and fell in 2011.

The personal effects being recovered were strewn across the massive grassy concert venue where 22,000 country music fans attended the Route 91 Harvest festival have become sentimental memories of loved ones for some, and haunting reminders of the night of terror for others.

People left behind thousands of lawn chairs, hats, wallets, souvenirs, cellphones, purses, boots and several other items, Clark County Emergency Manager John Steinbeck said.

People are being allowed to come retrieve their things in groups based on where they were seated, with authorities expanding the offer Monday to include people who were seated west of the stage, he said. As of Monday morning, 99 people who were seated east of the stage or in a VIP tent had sought to recover their belongings.

Authorities are powering up cellphones and asking people to text their full names to the phones to ensure they are returned to the correct owners.

Some of the victims have already been returned home and been memorialized at funerals while many others were in route on Monday ahead of services planned for later dates.

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