Group visits the Western Reserve

Tribune Chronicle
David Floering of Granville, left, Catherine Sheridan of Loveland and a Bloomfield native, and Jayne Floering of Granville, look at one of the rooms at the Harriet Taylor Upton House in Warren during the three-day tour of the Western Reserve of the Ohio Historical Decorative Arts Association.

Tribune Chronicle David Floering of Granville, left, Catherine Sheridan of Loveland and a Bloomfield native, and Jayne Floering of Granville, look at one of the rooms at the Harriet Taylor Upton House in Warren during the three-day tour of the Western Reserve of the Ohio Historical Decorative Arts Association.

WARREN — The decorative lamps, silverware and paintings of historic homes and buildings in Warren and parts of Trumbull and Mahoning counties were visited by members of the Ohio Historical Decorative Arts Association.

More than 25 members of the OHDAA, which was formed in 1991 and headquartered in Cincinnati, spent three days in Trumbull and Mahoning counties.

The theme for this year was ”Get to Know the Western Reserve,” organized by Bloomfield resident Judith Sheridan.

Tours included the Trumbull County Carnegie Law Library, Women’s Park, Warren City Hall, Harriet Taylor Upton House, Peter Allen Inn in Kinsman, Kinsman House in Warren and Century Village in Burton.

Betty Warwick, president of the association, said the group studies, preserves and supports other organizations to help them preserve decorative arts such as paintings, furniture, quilts, lamps and silver.

”We as a group travel to different places in Ohio to see decorative art and have helped many museums and exhibits. There are so many people who are very knowledgeable about decorative arts,” Warwick said.

She said it is nice to be able to see collections, including those in private homes opened for their visit.

”I had been to Trumbull County 15 years ago. Judy has always been able to arrange special visits,” Warwick said.

The three-day event also included guest speakers.

Keith Letsche of Illinois spoke on lighting in historic homes from 1620 to 1860.

”Much of what you would find in homes in the Western Reserve in Ohio came from New York and Boston along the Erie Canal and Ohio River from Philadelphia. Glass and metal came to the area,” he said.

Letsche said different lighting included candles, sperm oil lamps, and gas lights.

Chris Klingemier of Mecca shared information about historic clocks and others speaker talked about woodenware called Peaseware.

Sheridan and Rebecca Rogers of Youngstown were among the group’s founders.

Rogers said she likes to see programs locally.

”What is nice is Ohio has so many great areas to visit. We can go to Toledo and Lancaster and many small towns to see such a rich heritage.” she said.

The group had dinner at the Upton House and the Peter Allen Inn, which is an example of Neoclassical architecture.

In North Bloomfield, the group was able to tour the historic town hall and the local homes including Judi and Terry Sheridan’s.

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