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BREAKING NEWS

Local photographer develops power machine

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NILES — Bob Jadloski describes himself as a professional photographer and tech guy, not an inventor.

Even so, Jadloski, whose Trumbull County Courthouse photograph adorns a wall inside the Washington, D.C., office of U.S. Rep. Timothy J. Ryan, D-Howland, has created a machine he says could “revolutionize the energy industry.”

Jadloski started developing the concept more than five years ago. In 2014, he moved what he calls the Free Pressure Generator from his home in Niles to the Oak Hill Collaborative’s Tech Hub in Youngstown.

“I have photography experience and I’m an IT (information technology), computer-tech person. I’m not an oil-and-gas guy. I’m not an inventor by trade and I wouldn’t call myself one,” the Warren native said. “I worked in advanced engineering at Delphi, but had nothing to do with gas or oil.”

Jadloski has been sharing his project with area groups, clubs and organizations as part of an ongoing effort to “get the word out,” garner support and potentially attract investors.

Recently, he unveiled the generator at a Warren Rotary meeting. He has also been invited to explain its workings at a future business pitch event of the Sundown Rundown group that helps entrepreneurs connect with the investors, mentors and talent they need “to help take their idea to the next step,” the group’s website states.

Jadloski said what he has now is a large, unfinished prototype or “beta unit that is nowhere near what it will look like” when he’s done.

He said although there have been engineers who have worked with him on the project at the Tech Hub, he needs a team to help him fine-tune specifications for his generator before he moves forward to sell it.

His goal, he said, is to create a final product that is “friendly to the environment, an efficient, inexpensive way to produce green energy” and in the process promote economic development and create jobs.

“That’s what we should all want. Anyone who lives here in the Valley, we should all be working toward economic development,” Jadloski said. “The goal should always be to encourage people to stay here, not leave because we don’t have enough to offer them, we don’t have to jobs to keep them here. If we could have teams building FPGs, imagine what we could do.”

How it works

Basically, an FPG is anything that can spin a turbine and make electricity. The FPG is similar to a hydroelectric generator, which relies on flowing water on a dam, or hydropower, to produce electricity. But, Jadloski said, his FPG could easily rely on area natural-gas wells with the generator converting unused energy into electricity. The generator would be attached to a pressurized pipeline and the pressure from the gas lines would be used to run it.

“Since we have millions of miles of pipes running in the ground that have gas, water and sewage running in them, most are gravity flow, we could be harvesting the free energy from the flow of any of all of these sources,” Jadloski said. “The gas one is just the beginning. I envision in the future everyone would be able to have some form of a FPG connected to their house or business.

“This not the next windmill or solar panel. It’s utilizing what we already have right here in the Mahoning Valley and making the most of it.”

One generator has enough power to run 25 homes as long as there’s enough “flow and pressure” to run it, he said.

“It’s clean and self-sufficient,” Jadloski said.

Pat Kerrigan, Tech Hub director, said the FPG could be a game-changer.

“This particular project is something I think has great potential,” he said. “The invention itself is a simple concept. It’s a great idea and a workable concept.”

Dave Hanson of Newton Falls, who is familiar with the FPG, said Jadloski “has a great idea. It’s just going to take the right person” to help him launch it.

“The thing is there are so many pressurized gas lines, a lot of these natural resources, in under-developed countries,” Hanson said. “Bob has come up with an idea that’s green. This could be an opportunity to provide electric to schools, clinics … it’s just such a simple idea that could really benefit a lot of lives.”

vshank@tribtoday.com

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